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Things to Do in Malaga - page 2

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Hammam Al Ándalus Málaga
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3 Tours and Activities

Centuries ago, when Spain was under Muslim rule, Arab baths could be found in locations throughout the south. These hammams are said to have served as places of purification, hygiene and relaxation. Though few remain, you can still get a feel—in more ways than one—for what these tranquil getaways were like by experiencing the Hammam Al Andalus in Malaga.

Located in a historic building just off Martyers Square and next to an old Mudejar-towered church, this hammam—or Arab bath—features Moorish-inspired architecture. Think details such as horseshoe-shaped arches, colorful tiled walls, and ethereal lighting created by star-shaped skylights in the overhead dome. As is tradition, the Hammam Al Andalus has cold, warm and hot baths, as well as a steam room, and rest room, where you can relax and sip on traditional mint tea. Lasting 1.5 hours, the sessions allow guests to experience the various pools when not enjoying their massage.

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More Things to Do in Malaga

El Torcal del Antequera

El Torcal del Antequera

15 Tours and Activities

With its peculiar stacked rocks and knobbly karst towers, the otherworldly landscape of El Torcal is one of Spain’s most unique natural landscapes, formed over 150 million years ago, by the movement of tectonic plates beneath the ocean. Now a protected nature reserve, El Torcal’s unusual terrain is celebrated both for its remarkable geology and its diverse wildlife, and the rocky landscape is home to around 700 different plant species and a colorful array of nesting and migratory birds.

The starting point for most visitors is the El Torcal visitor center, but three color-coded walking trails also take in the park’s highlights – the 1.5km green route; the 2.5km yellow route, which climbs to the ‘Las Ventanillas’ (The Windows) lookout point at 1,200 meters; and the 4.5km red route, which reaches a height of over 1,300 meters.

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Malaga Cruise Port

Malaga Cruise Port

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8 Tours and Activities

Located on a stretch of Spain’s Mediterranean coast known as the Costa del Sol, the Andalusian city of Malaga offers a variety of historical and cultural attractions, from Moorish castles to Roman ruins to the birthplace of Pablo Picasso.

If you prefer to see other highlights of Andalusia, take a shore excursion to the bullfighting town of Ronda or the old Moorish city of Granada, home to the famous Alhambra. Cruise ships dock at the cruise terminals – A and B – in the eastern section of the Port of Malaga. From the port, it’s about a mile (1.6 km) to get to the edge of the city center; there is a public bus that can take you to the Paseo Parque, and from there you can walk up to the Cathedral of Malaga and other historical attractions.

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Reservatauro Ronda

Reservatauro Ronda

5 Tours and Activities
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Mijas

Mijas

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3 Tours and Activities

Mijas is the typical idyllic Andalusian village (or at least Mijas Pueblos, the old part of town, is). White-washed houses cluster against the side of a mountain range with a view of the Mediterranean. It's all white and blue and sparkling fresh.

If you like golf, this place is for you - there's a myriad of courses. If you don't, you might find something to like in Mijas' history as a a Phoenician trading town, its old churches, its local honey or its donkey taxis. It may be a long way from authentic, but it's still plenty quaint.

Mijas' greatest pleasure is probably just a walk to the steep heights of Mijas Pueblo, enjoying the contrast of white houses and bright bougainvillea.

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Torremolinos

Torremolinos

2 Tours and Activities

Torremolinos - 'Torry' to its intimates - is not exactly where you come when you want to get away from it all. This is the Costa del Sol in all its high-rise, concrete-block, package-tour glory. And if you're wanting some hectic nightlife and a beach crawling with people-watching opportunities, Torry delivers.

Some claim that Torremolinos has outgrown the excesses of the 1970s to become a new contender on the Costa del Sol. It's not really true. Come here for the cocktails and the kicking back, but don't expect a cultural treat. Take a stroll down Torremolinos' most famous street, Calle San Miguel, filled with shops and restaurants with a lively atmosphere, and end your walk with stairs that lead down to a fantastic beach.

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